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Tuesday Magic Item – Serpent Weapons

30 August, 2022

Gollaon grabbed up a shield from a fallen guard.  “Moon’s smile!  That bastard is using a snake sword.”

Voddick frowned and hunkered down behind his shield.  “Let me take the lead then.  Guard my back.”

“Gladly,” said Gollaon.

Serpent Weapons

These melee weapons are always decorated in snake or serpent motifs, snakeskin is often used in the grips and sheath if is a weapon that uses a sheath.  They seem to move and flex when held.

A serpent weapon is a +1 weapon but it has the ability to absorb normal venomous serpents, up to two if it is a small weapon, three for a medium weapon and five for a large weapon.  When it has one or more serpents absorb, the weapon gains an additional +1 to attack and on a critical hit, it can release one of the serpents, which gets a free and automatic hit on the same target.

Additionally, if the weapon has one or more serpents absorbed, the wielder gains a +1d4 bonus to Initiative.

Aura moderate transmutation; CL 9th
Slot none; Price 7,500 + cost of the weapon; Weight by weapon
Construction Requirements
Craft Magical Arms and Armor, cat’s grace, secret page; Cost 3,750 + cost of the weapon

For D&D 5E:

Magic weapon (varies), rare (requires attunement)

First paragraph as above.

A serpent weapon is a magic weapon that gives its wielder a +1 bonus to hit and damage and it has the ability to absorb normal venomous serpents, up to two if it is a small weapon, three for a medium weapon and five for a large weapon.  When it has one or more serpents absorb, the weapon gains an additional +1 to hit and on a critical hit, it can release one of the serpents, which gets a free and automatic hit on the same target.

Additionally, if the weapon has one or more serpents absorbed, the wielder gains a +1d4 bonus to Initiative.

Notes: I am sure I have done a similar weapon in the past but a theme that can always be revisted.

Image A sabre with a laminated (pamor) blade. At the base is a crowned Naga (dragon snake).  Indonesian.  From the Museum für Völkerkunde and used under an Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) license.

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