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Tuesday Magic Item – Helpful Honey

24 May, 2022

As sweet as“Kind of the beekeeper to give us some of his honey,” said Voddick tucking away the jar of honey.

“We help protect the hives, the product of the hives helps to protect us, it seems a virtuous cycle,” said Gollaon with a smile.

“I like that, seems . . . complete.”

“Sometimes the things we do work out.”

Helpful Honey

This honey is a beautiful golden hue but sometimes, if you catch it just right in the light, it has a rainbow sheen.  It must be kept in clear glass, stored in any other sort of container, it just vanishes.  The honey’s magic comes from the types of bees that make it and the types of flowers they gather pollen from, usually, one or both are from the fae worlds.

The fae magic empowers the basic healing powers of the honey, while it can be used for anything one can use honey for, it is best for aiding healing:

Used to bind and clean wounds (as part of a Heal check for first aid), it heals 1d3 points of damage and increases natural healing (as though the character was two levels higher for calculating such) for the next day.  A character can only benefit from this once a day.  (Requires one use of honey, for serious wounds, additional uses can be applied for an additional point of healing per use of honey.)

Mixed into tea or other hot drink, it soothes and helps the drinker against poisons and sickness, giving them a +4 bonus to their next save to resist ingested poison or disease.   (Requires one use of honey for each person imbibing the hot drinks.)

Made into cakes or other food, those who eat said food gain a +2 bonus on the first save they make against poison or disease in the next eight hours.  (Requires two uses of honey for each person food is prepared for.)

Aura moderate conjuration [healing]; CL 6th
Slot none; Price 250 (for eight uses); Weight 1 lb (for eight uses)
Construction Requirements
Brew potion, cure light wounds, neutralize poison, remove disease; Cost 125 (for eight uses)

Additionally, made into mead, it helps the drinker to sleep and to dream, indeed it makes dream magics more powerful (as if caster was 1d3 level higher).  (Making mead is outside of the scope of this and it is merely noted for completeness’ sake.)

For D&D 5E:

Wondrous item (honey), uncommon

First and second paragraph as above.

Used to bind and clean wounds (as part of a Wisdom (Healing) check taking a use an object action), it heals 1d3 points of damage and increases natural healing (healing an additional hit point per hit dice expended) for the next twelve hour or until they take a long rest.  A character can only benefit from this once until they have had a long rest.  (Requires one use of honey, for serious wounds, additional uses can be applied for an additional point of healing per use of honey.)

Mixed into tea or other hot drink, it soothes and helps the drinker against poisons and sickness, giving them advantage on their next saving throw to resist ingested poison or disease.   (Requires one use of honey for each person imbibing the hot drinks.)

Made into cakes or other food, those who eat said food gain advantage on the first saving throw they make against poison or disease, a short or long rest ends this effect is it has not already been used by then.  (Requires two uses of honey for each person food is prepared for.)

Additionally, made into mead, it helps the drinker to sleep and to dream, indeed it makes dream magics more powerful (as if caster was using a spell slot one level higher).  (Making mead is outside of the scope of this and it is merely noted for completeness’ sake.)

Notes: Another fae-adjacent item, perhaps whispering bees might make some of this honey.  Or perhaps you would need to raid a hive of giant bees or bees tended by hostile fae (pixie bee tenders?).

Image Honey spoon being used in a glass jar of Greek honey, by , found on Wikimedia Commons and used under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

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