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Tuesday Magic Item – Consanguinity Key (for Pathfinder and D&D5)

27 September, 2016

Unock the boodine“Is such an obsession healthy?” ask Voddick quietly.

Gollaon shrugged.  “Some think it is vital to keep a bloodline pure.  Though what they mean by purity varies widely,” he murmured back.

“I hope the wee lass passes, she seems a nice girl.”

“It will not be he fault if she does not . . . and we will protect her if she fails the test.”

“Aye,” nodded Voddick, his hand dropping to the hilt of his dagger.

Consanguinity Key

These keys are usually decorated with the heraldic arms of the commissioning family on the bow and other decorations, a clear crystal shaft is common as is it coming to a sharp point.  The level of decoration depends on the fashion when it was created, some are bejeweled, other are plain beyond a mark of ownership.

The key provides its bearer with a +4 competence bonus to Diplomacy check with the aristocracy, nobles and any factions aligned with such and a +2 resistance bonus against any effect that targets the blood (including diseases and poisons).

The key has four charges which can be used for the following effects, each requiring a drop of blood from each of two people:

  • One charge, if the two people are related out to seven levels of consanguinity (1/64th).
  • Two charges, how closely they are related.

Aura moderate divination; CL 7th
Slot – ; Price 5,000; Weight
Construction Requirements
Craft Wondrous Item, divination or scying; Cost 2,500

For D&D 5E:

Wondrous item, rare

First and third paragraph as above.

Second now reads:

The key provides its bearer with advantage on Charisma (Persuasion) rolls with the aristocracy, nobles and any factions aligned with such and advantage on save against any effect that targets the blood (including diseases and poisons).

Notes: More on consanguinity on Wikipedia.  Considering the value some cultures place on blood ties, such an item is obviously needed.

Photo by Thomas Quine and used used under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

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One comment

  1. Nice item. Tangentially, it reminds me of a teaching case in med school about some rare genetic illness where it says of the parents “consanguinity was denied.” Sometimes not sharing blood is an advantage! 😉



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